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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the regulatory environment, this so-called systemically important financial institutions, too big to fail. you are part of one of those. the fed came out with new capital buffers. jpmorgan and citigroup seem to be -- they are at the top of the list in internships of the buffers, the amount of capital that you are supposed to hold. you have to hold a 2.5% buffer while most other banks have a 1.5% buffer. every time we talk about jpmorgan, people say the fortress balance sheet. you're the strongest bank out there. why is it you have to have a 2.5% buffer when everyone else has a 1.5% buffer? >> anywhere from 0 to 2.5. banks are all different levels. i believe in capital. i believe in liquidity. i think our balance sheet is a fortress balance sheet right now. i never said we actually need the capital. regulators and politicians deemed that has to be necessary. it is what it is at this point. the way it gets calculated is peculiar. if you dig in the calculation, i don't agree with with the way they do that either. it actually penalizes successful companies. it penalizes trade finance. it penalizes
environment will remain unfavorable. in addition, the committee believes that the effective supply capacity of the economy is likely to continue to grow slowly over the forecast period. in october, cpi inflation picked up to 2.7%, partly as a result of higher university tuition fees. the committee's best collective judgment of the outlook for cpi inflation is summarized in chart 3 on page 8 of the report and is based on the same assumptions about monetary policy as chart 1. inflation is likely to remain above target for the first part of the forecast period and is higher than in august reflecting recent outturns and the announcement of large increases in household energy prices. further declines in inflation not being checked by price increases in sectors where market influences are weak. the rising student tuition fees alone added over not .3 percentage points to yesterday's inflation figure and do pestic gas and electricity prices are raising faster than wholesale energy prices. such factors are pushing inflation -- >> the point mervyn king is making there that part of the reason inflatio
air strikes. and it has been a problem since this administration helped create the environment in north africa. and in the middle east, with those who want to see israel destroyed could take power. more violence has occurred. not less. more people's lives are in danger, not less. there's less freedom of worship, not more. the things that we believe in, freedom of worship of all people, or no worship if people choose not to worship, those kind of things should be kept. and yet, we are seeing this administration took over afghanistan, more americans die and about half the time under commander-in-chief obama has died in seven years than president bush. american military. over 70% of those killed in afghanistan have been under commander obama and about half the time. we have seen violence escalating against americans in afghanistan. we have seen the last christian church, public christian church pull out of afghanistan. this administration should be encouraging freedom of worship, encouraging the liberation of women, of children. and yet, for all its help, it has created environmen
source, natural gas, fracking than environment. each week keep it here where wall street meets main street. i will so see you next weekend.
a particular worldview and a set of assumptions and values that increasingly in a polarized environment makes it difficult for them to vote for scott brown and linda lingle and heather wilson. the problems with republicans is that they're based -- that's a very ideologically driven voters, tea party folks, but part of the republican base is more open, friendly, to voting for democrats than the democratic base is for voting for republicans, i believe. i'm sure we could chew this over. let me give you an example. but me give you an example. heidi is a terrific candidate in north olympic terrific candidate and north dakota. mitt romney won north dakota by 20, 21 points. and heidi was able to overcome that. it's true that she won them as the president one north dakota, slightly less than president, that mr. romney one north dakota slightly less than the president one massachusetts. but i think the republican coalition includes kind of a soft swing voter that is inclined to vote republican, but is more willing to vote for democrats. and, jim matheson surviving utah is amazing. amazing. john barrow
is the contributing environment that is lending itself. a lot of the police officers have to be at a certain rank and have to be kept on the contract as a source of the sort of securing full time to permanent status with protection. this is one of the conditions that actually makes it much easier on superiors and senior members of the security establishment to basically pressure them into taking questionable activities. if you don't pull the trigger then i will endure contract by the end of this year because you are in a contract you are basically not protected. i would -- you know, i would question the assumption that the securities sector reform is necessarily aimed at, you know, disempowering are dismantling the securities sector, and i would actually say that there are a lot of measures, a lot of proposals in the case of egypt that would strengthen the status of the living conditions and the working conditions of the egyptian police. >> we think that this idea of the reform versus strengthening. when we talk about strengthening, are we talking about more weapons, more capabilities that they c
in the environment or from whatever source, you're going to be, in my experience, not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do i"n exist, how do i deal with the problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues, and as we are welt aware, there's a lot of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge, and many in the room have been major contributors to that, and we've made great strides. it seems to me one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage advances in science and medicine to actually benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, solved, resolved by the advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us, and why i'm interested in being here, why we're participating in this, and there's still a lot of work to be done. now that you're allÑi here, noby leaves the room without signing a pledge without donating your time, effort to the clause; right? you wouldn't be here otherwise. let's talk a little bit or think
. what is different about this environment is that the bush tax rate will expire. we will revert to the rates under clinton for everyone unless president obama signed an extension. after this campaign, that would be pretty shocking. he ran explicitly but as a candidate to say that he will raise taxes on the top. unless he suddenly decides that, i didn't mean it, it does not really matter all that much what house speaker thinks. the tax cut will expire unless obama is willing to extend it. that changes the whole dynamic. virtually all of the republicans have decided the broker norquist pledged not to raise tax rates. if the tax cuts expire at the end of the year and then in january you extended for 97% of americans, the new never voted to raise tax rates. your only cutting taxes. it is possible for something like that -- when the speaker said that yesterday, it was not really reflecting the world that he now lives in. unless the president is willing to extend the tax cuts, they will not be extended. >> i have a question for you. to what extent will there be a major -- and the repu
at a normal interest rate, i'm a guy that wants to go 50/50 bond equities, are you saying in this environment i should be 75 equities, 25 bonds because of the risk? >> yeah, i think the problem is nobody is 50/50. today people are sitting at 80% this bonds. 10% quit tis and a little bit of cash. here's the big issue. americans need to retire. 75% of them have already said they don't have enough money. 40% said they'll never have enough money. so they're funding their lon term liability which is retirement 15 years, on average 58 years old, and they're funding it with a security that's at the end of its peak cycle. so usual getting zero rate of return and you're saying i'll fund the liability by an investment that i'm guaranteed to lose money in. the world is more complicated. it's not 50 stock and 50 bond. so you have to say i need to start to move into a more balanced portfolio. the big problem people have is they think it's a binary switch. i go from stocks to bonds. maybe risky people and speculate tors do that. but it means i need to start to lessen my bond position, because more balanced
. natural gas, fracking, and the environment. each week keep it here where wall street meets main street. have a great week, everybody. see you next weekend.
should be positioning your portfolio in this environment of uncertainty. he manages more than $14 billion for westfield capital. and will, i know you've got interesting thoughts about what's working right now and what people should be doing. which is great, we hear from a lot of people who freeze up at this point, keep things in cash. but you're looking specifically at stocks that might benefit from things like an improvement in the housing industry, which is something we heard yesterday from home depot. >> yeah, exactly. i think the one big difference with the debt ceiling negotiation, for example, the republicans had an incentive to make the current administration look bad because they're trying to win an election, right? well, now with the election over, i think there's an incentive for them not to obstruct. and so i do think something will get done. it'll most likely be a minor deal to buy some time and maybe we get a major deal in 2013. but at the end of the day, i think there'll be some fiscal drag in the first half of '13. rather than sitting cash where you get zero, what can you d
the average reinsurance rate environment will not change based on sandy loss only. >> what's your take on the insurers generally speaking, do you like them as group, what are issues they need to face to see share outperformance? >> it will some quite some time to get some decent estimates. there's uncertainties in many regards and clearly estimates my tend upwards from the current estimates. we just have had a down ground from a hurricane to a post tropical storm. that means deductibles for homeowners basically will be much smaller and losses may be higher. we also have business interruption basically going up. but for swiss re, we have around 400 million of net cap losses and now a budget of 1.4 billion for that. so it shows that fourth quarter will not be hugely impacted from the storm. the real issue for the industry is low interest rates. recurring yields are coming down and the longer we have low interest rates, the longer recurring yields are really heading down to low levels and impacting roes. that's the real issue. >> travelers, primaries will take the biggest hit. how does th
such as protection of the environment as well as narrowing the gap between rich and poor. but as i said, these are very carefully worded. especially this year. no one wants to say something that is too aggressive or too reformist. because of course there is a pretty powerful group that are against pro market reforms. there are some that benefit, some leaders especially that benefit from the status quo like the officials of state owned enterprises which enjoy some advantages in the form of easier access to loan and less competition. >> if i could ask whether it really matters if the way that we read the tea leaves if it's the reformers or the conservatives here who have more influence in terms of this transition. what he he's the latest view one impact it will have? >> tons of speculation ahead of the roll out on thursday. it's likely going to be a mix of both some reformerses and some conservatives, but you're right in the sense it may not matter in the short term, but long term it will have an impact because some analysts say that the hu jintao administration on the way out did not do
process and with this going on, we will have very difficult environment for investment and growth for the euro area to go ahead. so without clarity where the euro area goes, the environment will be quite difficult. p. >> okay. thanks very much for that. now, he mentioned weakness in europe. that's extending to the u.s. we are seeing futures trying to rebond here, but again, we saw levels of decline in the range of 1.3 to 1.5 yesterday for the major bourses. this morning we're really only getting about 25 points in rebound for the dow jones industrial average. which is thousand sitting at 12,559. the nasdaq and s&p are also showing a little about the of a r rebit of a rebound, but not huge moves. investors digest the growth tigs or lack thereof. spain is trying to move to the up side adding almost 0.3%, so a little better than last time we checked in. the other three down. as we're learning about the slowing of the german economy and the ftse 100, shedding 0.4%, below the 5700 mark. now, we are seeing in the uk a little better, but broadly speaking a mixed picture. we started off s
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. [ chuckles ] ♪ [ honk! ] ♪ [ honk! ] ♪ [ honk! ] [ male announcer ] now you'll know when to stop. [ honk! ] the all-new nissan altima with easy fill tire alert. [ honk! ] it's our most innovative altima ever. nissan. innovation that excites. now get a $199 per month lease on a 2013 nissan altima. ♪ >> welcome back to "hannity." as charles krauthammer just explained, even though republicans didn't wen the white house, the party has the tool its needs to make a comeback. already today, many are asking the question, who will be the next star of the guilt o.p.? one person getting a lot of attention is florida senator marco rubio. he was often seen on the campaign trail this election cycle. this week, it was announced high would travel to iowa later this month. what could this mean? joining me to discuss senator rubio and the deep bench of the republican party, the author of "who is counting, how fraudsters and bureaucrats put your vote at risk." and fox news contributor. thank yo
environment makes it difficult for them to vote for scott brown and heather wilson. the problem with the republicans -- they have some very ideologically driven voters, but part of the republican base is more open to voting for democrats than the democratic base is to vote for republicans, i believe. that even example. -- let me give you an example. heidi is a terrific candidate in north dakota. mitt romney one north dakota by 21. and i was able to overcome that. -- heidi was able to overcome that. it is true that the president won north dakota slightly less than -- mitt romney won north dakota at slightly less than the president won massachusetts. but the republican coalition includes kind of a soft swing voter that is inclined to vote republican, but as more willing to vote for democrats. john barrow in georgia, the republican candidate was horrendous. a challenger refused to debate the incumbent. [laughter] i didn't say it was a bad decision, i just said it says something about the challenger. i think this is an additional problem. it is easier for moderate, centrist democrat
not be a decision made exclusively by him? >> i think not. he grew up in an environment in the military where one of the first things you learn is that bad news doesn't get any better with age. the best thing you can do is tell the boss bad news as soon as it happens or as soon as possible after it happens, because it can't be fixed later the older it gets. the worse it gets the noisier it gets and the -- and eventually the inevitable is going to happen anyway. it's best to cut sooner rather than later if if you really love the country and really think what you're doing is important. even if you're pressured by the white house, the best thing to do is to get out early. >> and quickly because just one minute leicht. andrea said he's expected to testify before the cia. this investigation with benghazi do you see any parallels, anything that might also have factored in with na resignation? >> well of course there's a link. i think at some juncture if he told the truth he would say he didn't have as much to do when on the ground what went on on the ground as people think. a
cares about human rights or who cares about the political environment in the foreign-policy concerns that relate to north korea. as a general rule, u.s. north korea policy follows a very similar and repetitive pattern. there are provocations by the regime missile launches, underground nuclear tests with the occasional sinkings of the south korean vote. these are followed or threats of sanctions by the international community. and then of course as with the perennial recalcitrant child, the promises that her behavior whereupon the international community comes back and provides more aid to the regime in many respects continue to prop up the regime. and of course received almost never reaches people for whom it is destined. it siphoned off by the military or sold on the black market for hard currency. this pattern raises several questions for policymakers and in the course of our discussion today, i just want to plant a few seeds that we can come back to. for particular areas that i think are worth discussing and thinking about. one is what is the effect if any of sanctions, monetary s
do them. based on what we think the macroeconomic environment is going to do. >> so you were at that meeting at the white house this week. you joined a number of ceos at the white house yesterday. did the president give you hope that layoffs can be avoided at aetna? how was that meeting? >> i thought the meeting was a very constructive, very frank and open dialogue. i was impressed with the level and the grasp of the issues that the president had and his willingness to listen to american business about the ways that we needed to solve this problem. i think there is is a path to get this done. it's not going to get all done before the end of the year. but i think our message to the president was we're here to support you if you can avoid the cliff and put together a very specific framework on how we're going to get the economy going. because going over the cliff creates more joblessness. and if we can avoid that, we still don't grow the economy in 2013, so we need to show the business community, and quite frankly, all americans, that we have a plan to deal with this deficit so
this and i think 2013 will be a better environment for equity. but right now earnings estimates in our opinion are way too high and have to come down. >> so both you guys don't think that we're going to before january 1st get a deal where the bush tax cuts are extended just for those at 12250 or below? >> no. to have any kind of deal with the republicans, obama has to compromise to some degree. >> that's why i want to rise above this and just skip talking about it, but he'll come out today at 1:00 and we'll hear folks at the top will have to pay more. we're going to hear that again. plouffe is quote thed as saying that. can we just cut the bs? they're not going to do it. >> that you will krugman this morning, how far should the president go? my answer is not far at all. obama should hang tough declaring himself willing to hold ground even at the cost of letting his opponents and foot down on a still shaky economy and this is definitely no time to negotiate a grand bargain on the budget that snatches defeat from the jaws of victory p. >> that's what we head from podesta yesterday, too.
sorts of things. but also along with training them, you have to create an institution and environment were you see guys going to happen and it's not necessarily a career ender when it happened. but we are working on it and i think we've gotten better because it's absolutely essential that we do. briefly in the demographics, one of the things i noticed was about 70% are public diplomacy dollars were spent if you do it demographically on an over the age we flipped out because looking at the world and the way it is, the fact of the matter is you have a far better opportunity employment being a planting seeds of the younger demographic, paul said it is difficult when someone reaches 40, 50, 62 change their perception of their ideas. when they are younger you have an ability to do it. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan, 15 or 16 years old, she will be able to change the perception of the united states and her family and her community and away we never could. so it's a wise estimate, not just for the future, but frankly for right now. >> so with a clash of tech
countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is opportunity for us as a country. if you look at the congressional budget analysis and joint tax committee analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact and growth, all will lead to more growth, whether corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right but if the president insists as he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and, fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't ice the words rates himself but jay carney, the white house press secretary said the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. if he insists that tax rates go up for those making over $250,000, what's, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress and senate? >> first having worked in two white houses i believe a president does have a veto over the press secretary. thank goodness b
the journal on what improvements we see by putting teenagers in this environment. it will be printed next year. what we're seeing is a 10-15% improvement on survival rates. we're not dealing with medicine, just environment. if you had a drug that will give you 10-15% improvement on your outcome, they would throw billions at you. >> you cannot really argue with that. it sounds like a great plan. was there someone specifically? how did you become interested in teenage cancer? how did you notice there was a gap in this? >> as i said earlier, i noticed basically because my doctor and his wife noticed. i just have one of those brains that seem to me straight line, sensible things to do. there is a huge problem in madison of the moment. costs are going through the roof. there are other things you can do to improve the care of the patient. the one role of medicine that is observation of pedicethe patien. basically from the beginning when it was posed to me as a problem. >> when it was announced you were speaking here we did get questions from the general public, and some came from young adult teenage
examines how the u.s. can be economically competitive in a global environment. >> later today british prime minister david cameron delivers his keynote address on policy at the lord mayor's banquet in london. the event is attended by members of the city's financial and diplomatic corps. you can see his remarks live at 3:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that insures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly-elected congress starts work in january, but the current congress still has work to do through the end of the
the environment for investment. .. that is vanishing. i know people who believe it is very important energy and should not be and it is not, in this case, a political issue. in europe and in america, they're going to make this outlandish opacity. you know, the opaque nature of these deals is corruption. when you publish what you pay, then the civil societies in those regions get to hold their governments to account. that is one the best things you can do to stimulate business and investments. thank you. [applause] >> hello, this issue is really close to my heart. how do we develop a global citizen's perspective and incentivize people to prioritize life outside of the u.s.? >> this sounds good. >> there is an amazing website. they just put on a concert in central park and they played. we have neil young, the black keys, a lot of people think, what? they are really pushing this idea. it is a jump in human consciousness. and i think that going to that website, i recommend it. >> good evening, i am vivien. i want to thank you for speaking candidly about africa. i am excited to sure about my con
, and therefore leveraging it to create the environment for investment. the corruption piece is amazing. let me tell you -- but in the dodd-frank bill, there can an amendment called cardin-lugar and it makes it law that any extractive industry, mining, oil, gas, registered on the new york stock exchange, it is law that they have to publish what they paid for those mining rights. it sounds obvious, doesn't it? the truth is that right now, the american petroleum institute is suing the s.e.c. to try and overthrow that. that is astonishing. i know people and oil companies who are amazing people, and it is very important to energy here. and shouldn't be and is not, in this case, a political issue. europe and america are going to make this outlandish opacity, and if that word doesn't exist i'd like to suggest it to the committee of the oxford dictionary. you know, the opaque nature of these deals is north of the equator. when you publish what you pay, then the civil societies in those regions get to hold the government to account. that is one of the best things you can do to stimulate business invest
into these environments which are very, very important places to be, and debate our core value, not just explained them, not just lecture, but actually debate our greatest strengths i think will be stronger. so that was one of the ways we really tried to do that. and also to take the benefit of the folks who were there in the field, give information as to who was the important audiences for the bbg. >> can i just clarify one thing? when i said more guidance from foreign policy leadership for the bbg, i certainly didn't mean that the bbg should forsake or distort or anyway jeopardize the journalistic values. very, very important. but for example, the bbg's, the board of governors decide where the assets are allocated. in other words, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessi
in this consolidated apple like checkout, iphone, anyone can check you out, it's efficient, nice environment. it's the apple store customer interface combined with the best brands of the world in a small geography. we had $250 a square foot in sales with the traffic down 12%. >> for your sake and for ron johnson's sake i hope this works and i love a great come back story. >> i want to leave our viewers with one thing. the biggest problem people have with something like this, how can i own a stock when the sales are down 26%? i'll make one analogy and help people think about how to value this company. we took a stake in wendy's, why did people not like wendy's? i get a chance we come back after a commercial, i'm happy to stay. >> i think we're going. >> give me one minute and i'm happy to come back another time. wendy's, people hated the management, there was a fast growing company called tim horton's inside wendys. we separated and the stock doubled. we have this fast growing retail inside jcpenney, profitable and high margins and the rest of jcpenney is shrinking. it's hard to look at it on a c
a very weak economy. and we are looking at, as you said, an environment in which people are really in panic mode over the fiscal cliff. and i think there is a lot of support actually because the population doesn't seem to understand what exactly the fiscal cliff is and what it means and what they're hearing on television is an awful lot of hype about what's going to happen come if the fiscal cliff isn't a boy. and i think what that is doing is it's generating quite a bit of support for both sides to come together. it seems like the right thing to do, put your partisan differences aside and do what's best for the country. and figure out someway to avoid the cliff. and what that means in practice is striking some kind of a deal. what we are probably all heard referred to as a grand bargain. and i think what is important to keep in mind is that the grand bargain itself is really a form of austerity. it's an austerity plan. and so when you got an economy that is still struggling to fully find its feet, and you're at the same time talking about imposing austerity, i think we've seen pre
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)